Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (A-F)
A-F G-L M-Q R-Z Untitled

Action At A Distance see Crime Of The Century

Alexander The Great see Farewell Great Macedon

The Aliens In The Blood The Second Doctor
Writer: Robert Holmes Notes: Holmes submitted this idea on October 22nd, 1968, shortly after completing work on The Krotons. Script editor Terrance Dicks was wary of the proposal, feeling that OSCOC bore similarities to the eponymous facility in The Wheel In Space. He was also concerned that Holmes' proposal that the Mark II Humans be distinguished by a physical feature like an extra-long thumb was reminiscent of the TV series The Invaders. “The Aliens In The Blood” was rejected soon thereafter. Years later, however, Holmes was commissioned to write an amended version of the serial -- now set in present-day Chile and with the Doctor and his companions replaced by Dr John Cornelius and Prof Curtis Lark -- for BBC Radio 4. Cowritten with Rene Basilico, it was transmitted in six weekly episodes as Aliens In The Mind from January 2nd, 1977.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Zoe
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: In the 22nd century, the Outer Space Commission Of Control (OSCOC) controls the flow of traffic in the spacelanes. OSCOC is located on an island in the Indian Ocean, and its staff -- led by Dean Thawne -- are in frequent conflict with the primitive natives. The TARDIS materialises on the island in the midst of a rash of sabotage which has resulted in the loss of many Earth spaceships. Although the natives are suspected, it transpires that the culprits are actually mutant “Mark II” humans, who have infiltrated OSCOC. These mutants have gained the power of ESP but are cold and emotionless, and now intend world conquest. The Doctor defeats the mutants by constructing a device which broadcasts along their psychic wavelength and burns out their superhuman abilities.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #242, DWM Winter Special 1994, DWM Special Edition #4

Alixion The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Robin Mukherjee Notes: Mukherjee was new to television when he was commissioned to provide a storyline for “Alixion” on November 18th, 1987. It was still being worked on a year later and was a candidate for inclusion in Season Twenty-Six, but development was slow due to Mukherjee's inexperience. It then became a strong possibility for the final slot of Season Twenty-Seven, before the cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: 3
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-Six and Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Partial(?) scripts
Synopsis: The giant beetles of the planet Alixion, led by their Queen, produce an intelligence-boosting elixir. However, the Doctor discovers that this is because the Abbot of a human monastery on Alixion is feeding people to the beetles. The Abbot now intends to see what happens when the beetles consume a Time Lord.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM Special Edition #10

The Amazons see The Prison In Space

The Angarath The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Eric Pringle Notes: On August 11th, 1975, Pringle was commissioned for the first two episodes of “The Angarath” by producer Philip Hinchcliffe. These were delivered on September 27th, but after receiving no reply from the Doctor Who production office as to their suitability, Pringle eventually decided to complete the serial regardless, submitting the final two parts on March 10th, 1976. Hinchcliffe had no intention of proceeding further with the story, however, and the situation was finally dealt with on June 23rd. Several years later, Pringle would write The Awakening for Season Twenty-One.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a race of people offering human sacrifices to sentient rocks.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Ants The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: This idea was submitted on January 16th, 1967.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The TARDIS brings the Doctor and his companions to the Nevada Desert, where they discover they have been shrunk to a tenth of an inch in height. To make matters worse, they learn that the local ants have been made super-intelligent by atomic bomb tests and plan to take over the Earth.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Five

Arcade see The Nightmare Fair

Ark In Space The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Robert Holmes' The Ark In Space.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands aboard a space station which houses all of humanity in suspended animation, waiting until the disease-ravaged Earth is hospitable again. However, a malfunction has kept the sleepers quiescent for eons, and in the interim, an insectoid alien species has invaded the station and infected the humans' leader, Noah, as a first step towards the conquest of the Earth.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

Attack From The Mind The Sixth Doctor
Writer: David Halliwell Notes: Halliwell was part of the original writing team for what would become The Trial Of A Time Lord. He and Jack Trevor Story were asked to develop the “future” element of the evidence against the Doctor. These would be two linked two-part adventures, which would share most of their sets (as had also been done in Season Twelve with The Ark In Space and Revenge Of The Cybermen). Halliwell's story would introduce new companion Melanie Bush. After an initial meeting of the writers with script editor Eric Saward on July 9th, 1985, Halliwell quickly set to work; Saward accorded his segment the title “Attack From The Mind” in mid-August. In mid-September, Saward requested various changes to the scripts. The planet Fred (which stood for FRee Equal Democracy, with Penelope an acronym for PENultimate ELegance Order and PoisE) would now be planet Trike, and the Trikes would not speak with the East End accents Halliwell had intended. Conflict would be generated amongst the Trikes by dividing them into a militaristic camp and visionary camps. Several elements were excised, such as the Doctor being willing to use the TARDIS to change history, he and Mel being miniaturised by the Penelopeans, and the Doctor shooting his enemies dead. The story would now end with the Penelopeans losing their powers and the Trikes in control, to segue into Story's “The Second Coming”. However, Story was struggling mightily, and Saward found “Attack From The Mind” listless. Consequently, after five drafts, Halliwell's scripts were abandoned on October 18th. The “future” segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord was ultimately written by Pip and Jane Baker.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Mel
Episodes: 2
Planned For: The third segment of The Trial Of A Time Lord for Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Full scripts
Synopsis: At the Doctor's trial for meddling, the Valeyard presents evidence from the future to show that the Doctor will not learn the error of his ways. The TARDIS is lured to the planet Fred, where tunnels are being excavated by the rodent-like natives who are plagued by vivid mirages. The Doctor and Mel are captured by the Freds, but the Doctor is freed by the lemurine Penelopeans, beings who now dwell within their own imagination. The Freds are hunting for their control centre to prevent them from returning to corporeal form; the hallucinations are the Penelopeans' defense system. The Doctor agrees to bring a Fred back in time so that the Penelopeans can devise a form of protection against them. However, he is recaptured by the Freds, who complete their excavation. In fact, the Penelopeans are homicidal beings who retreated into their own minds so that they would not wipe themselves out. They have been toying with the Freds -- a peaceful race -- out of boredom. The Doctor and Mel escape to the TARDIS as war breaks out between the Penelopeans and the Freds. The Valeyard explains that the intervention of the High Council would be required deal with the consequences of the Doctor's meddling.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #201, DWM Special Edition #3

The Automata The Third Doctor
Writer: Robert Holmes Notes: Holmes was commissioned to write a storyline for “The Automata” on January 16th, 1973. It did not find favour with producer Barry Letts and script editor Terrance Dicks, however, and was rejected ten days later. Holmes was commissioned to write The Time Warrior instead.
Characters: The Third Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eleven
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #246, DWM Special Edition #2

Avatar The Seventh Doctor
Writer: David A McIntee Notes: “Avatar” was inspired by the works of horror pioneer HP (Howard Phillips) Lovecraft, creator of the Cthulhu Mythos in the early twentieth century. The serial's Arkham setting was a fictional town created by Lovecraft, and indeed a supporting character was called “Howard Phillips”. Since location filming in New England was not feasible, McIntee was asked to rewrite “Avatar” for Cornwall; he also anticipated that lack of content would result in the story being trimmed from four episodes to three. He had completed the script for episode one when Doctor Who was cancelled in September 1989, resulting in the story's abandonment. McIntee would later write numerous Doctor Who novels for Virgin Publishing and BBC Books, beginning with another Lovecraft-inspired tale, White Darkness, published in June 1993.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Partial script
Synopsis: In 1927 Arkham, Massachusetts, aliens with the ability to possess and reanimate cadavers plan to clone the fossilised remains of a Silurian god.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM Special Edition #10

Bad Destination see Earth Aid

Bar Kochbar The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: This idea was submitted on January 16th, 1967.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In early 2nd century Palestine, the Doctor and his companions become involved with the efforts of the Jewish leader Bar Kokhba to organise an army against the Romans.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Five

The Beasts Of Manzic The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Robin Smyth Notes: This storyline was formally rejected on May 13th, 1975.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8

The Big Store The Second Doctor
Writers: David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke Notes: Ellis and Hulke were writing “The Big Store” by the fall of 1966, and turned in the storyline for episode one on November 15th. Producer Innes Lloyd and story editor Gerry Davis liked the ideas, but felt they would work more effectively in an airport setting; Lloyd also desired a six-part serial. “The Big Store” was therefore abandoned, and Ellis and Hulke reworked the concept into The Faceless Ones.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Polly, Ben
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands in a department store in 1973 London. The store has been taken over by two species of aliens -- one, a master race, is identified only by numbers, while the members of the faceless slave race are named with letters. The latter are being transformed into duplicates of the humans which have been abducted onto the aliens' spacecraft to maintain the charade at the store, while the unprocessed members pose as mannequins. The master aliens intend to colonise the Earth, subjugating humanity by releasing a new strain of bubonic plague. The Doctor convinces the aliens to leave the Earth in peace.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The Second Doctor

The Brain-Dead The Third Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: This idea was submitted during the spring of 1971. It was rejected by script editor Terrance Dicks, but its inclusion of the Ice Warriors inspired the development of The Curse Of Peladon.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo, UNIT
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Nine
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Ice Warriors, led by Commander Kulvis, plan to invade modern-day Earth using a weapon called the ‘Z’ beam, which is capable of freezing anything it touches to absolute zero. In particular, the Ice Warriors can use it to freeze a human brain, turning the afflicted individual into a subservient Brain-Dead. The Ice Warriors hijack a communications satellite and use it to take over the crew of its receiving station, whom they set to work constructing a giant ‘Z’ beam transmitter. They plan to use the satellite network to broadcast the ‘Z’ beam around the world, enslaving mankind and adjusting the Earth's climate to something suitable for Martian habitation. Realising that metals are extremely conductive at absolute zero, the Doctor overloads the ‘Z’ beam transmitter just at the point of broadcast, destroying the Ice Warriors and the Brain-Dead.
References: Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Brain Drain see The Spare-Part People

Britain 408 AD The First Doctor
Writer: Malcolm Hulke Notes: “Britain 408 AD” was first submitted on September 2nd, 1963. Story editor David Whitaker asked Hulke to revise his original storyline, however; he felt that the plot -- with its many opposing factions -- was too complicated, and also that the serial's conclusion echoed that of 100,000 BC too closely. It was hoped that an amended version of “Britain 408 AD” might occupy the sixth slot of Season One (Serial F), to be directed by Christopher Barry, but on September 23rd it was decided that the production block did not need another historical story and Hulke's serial was abandoned. The spot in the schedule was ultimately occupied by The Aztecs, while Hulke began work on “The Hidden Planet” instead. Following Whitaker's departure, Hulke resubmitted “Britain 408 AD”. It was rejected on April 2nd, 1965, by Whitaker's successor, Dennis Spooner, because the Romans had already featured in his own The Romans.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara (original submission; the resubmission presumably replaced Susan with Vicki)
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Seasons One and Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Involved the departure of the Romans from Britain around the start of the fifth century in the midst of clashes against the Celts and the Saxons, culminating with the time travellers fleeing the indigenous savages back to the safety of the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Castle Of Doom The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Fisher Notes: Fisher submitted this storyline to producer John Nathan-Turner on November 7th, 1979. Nathan-Turner rejected it in favour of developing The Leisure Hive.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K-9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Cat's Cradle The Sixth Doctor The Seventh Doctor
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: In 1984, this unsolicited idea was submitted to script editor Eric Saward, who rejected it as being too complex. When Andrew Cartmel became Doctor Who's script editor in early 1987, Platt offered him a reworked version of “Cat's Cradle”. Cartmel felt that the concept could not be achieved on the programme's budget, but encouraged Platt to continue pitching story ideas; this led to Ghost Light. Platt later developed the storyline as the basis for his Doctor Who: The New Adventures novel Cat's Cradle: Time's Crucible, released in February 1992 by Virgin Publishing.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor (original submission; the revised version featured the Seventh Doctor)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-Two and Twenty-Five
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS is turned inside-out, forcing the Doctor to navigate through an alien landscape in order to restore his time machine.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #190

The Celestial Toymaker The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Brian Hayles' The Celestial Toymaker.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In the year 2525, the Doctor is kidnapped by a malevolent entity called the Toymaker. Acting at the behest of the Master, the Toymaker forces the Doctor to play a mind game or face eternal imprisonment.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

Century House The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Tom MacRae Notes: After writing Rise Of The Cybermen / The Age Of Steel for Doctor Who's 2006 season, MacRae was commissioned to pen “Century House” for the following year. It wound up not fitting into the schedule for the 2007 season, however, and so it was deferred it until 2008. Because of its almost exclusive focus on the Doctor, it was intended that “Century House” would be made as part of the season's sixth production block, double-banked with Turn Left (Block Seven), which shone the spotlight firmly on Donna Noble. However, executive producer Russell T Davies grew unsatisfied with the premise that he had given MacRae -- of the Doctor appearing on the supernatural documentary programme Most Haunted. He also worried about the season having two comedy-oriented episodes in The Unicorn And The Wasp and “Century House”, especially since these were planned to air consecutively. Finally, in mid-October 2007, it was decided to replace “Century House” with Davies' own script, Midnight.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Martha (original version), Donna (revised version)
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Nine (original version), eighth episode of Season Thirty (revised version)
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: While Donna watches with Sylvia at home, the Doctor joins a live broadcast of paranormal reality show Most Haunted. Their target is an old house purportedly haunted by the “Red Widow”. The climax would have involved the house catching fire.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #20, Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale

The Cerebroids The Third Doctor
Writers: Charlotte and Dennis Plimmer Notes: Scripts for “The Cerebroids” were commissioned on June 24th, 1970. On the 29th, however, the serial was abruptly abandoned.
Characters: The Third Doctor (with Jo and UNIT?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eight
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2

Child Prodigy The Fourth Doctor
Writers: Alistair Beaton and Sarah Dunant Notes: Beaton -- a colleague of script editor Douglas Adams from his days as a comedy writer -- and Dunant were commissioned on December 12th, 1978. On January 9th, 1979, however, their scripts were rejected as being unacceptable.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Seventeen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned time loops or freezes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

The Children Of January The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Michael Feeney Callan Notes: Callan was commissioned on February 5th, 1985. “The Children Of January” was probably intended to be the sixth and final story of Season Twenty-Three, to be made as Serial 7F by Bob Gabriel, a director new to Doctor Who. However, on February 27th, it was announced that production of Doctor Who was being suspended until Spring 1986, with the programme then returning for a season of twenty-five-minute episodes. Callan was asked to rework his storyline for this format. But then, at the end of May, it was decided that Season Twenty-Three would be only fourteen episodes long, leading to the development of The Trial Of A Time Lord and the abandonment of all of the original Season Twenty-Three serials.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Probably the sixth story of Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Children Of Seth see Manpower

Children's Seth see Manpower

Circus Of Destiny The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Ben Steed Notes: Steed delivered his storyline in January 1983, but it was not taken forward.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: 2
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Claws Of Axos The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Bob Baker and Dave Martin's The Claws Of Axos.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Alien Axons arrive on modern-day Earth, offering a miraculous substance called Axonite in exchange for sanctuary. However, the Doctor discovers that the Axons and Axonite are manifestations of an energy-absorbing parasite called Axos, created by the Master.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Clock The First Doctor
Writer: David Ellis Notes: “The Clock” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

Crime Of The Century The Seventh Doctor
aka Action At A Distance
Writer: Ben Aaronovitch Notes: The intended third story of Season Twenty-Seven was meant to be a direct sequel to the second story (known as “Thin Ice”), which introduced Raine Cunningham as a baby born in the 1960s. Now she would be seen again as an adult in modern times, and become the Doctor's new companion. Script editor Andrew Cartmel envisioned Raine as an aristocratic graduate of fine finishing schools -- providing a sharp contrast with her streetwise predecessor Ace -- yet very adept at taking care of herself, given her father's career in the London underworld. In particular, Cartmel thought in terms of the classy spy Emma Peel, as played by Diana Rigg in The Avengers from 1965 to 1967. Only the first scene -- in which Raine steals away from a dinner party at a country house and cracks a safe to find the Doctor inside -- had been mapped out when Doctor Who was cancelled in September 1989. Indeed, it was not a certainty that Aaronovitch would ultimately have written these scripts. The title “Crime Of The Century” was assigned by Doctor Who Magazine in 1997. Cartmel preferred “Action At A Distance”, but hewed to the established name when he created an audio adaptation for Big Finish Productions, released in May 2011.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably the third story of Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In the present day, the Doctor's goddaughter Raine Cunningham has grown up to become a burglar and a safe cracker, even as her father -- once an East End crime boss -- is trying to go straight.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM #433, DWM Special Edition #10

The Cybs The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: The Doctor answers a distress call emanating from an Earth outpost on 21st-century Mars. He finds it under attack by the Cybs -- cybernetic pirates who plan to kidnap the humans and transform them into more Cybs.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Daemons The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines developed for, but dropped from, Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Robert Sloman and Barry Letts' The Daemons.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: When a prehistoric burial mound in witch-haunted Salem, Massachusetts is opened by a team of archaeologists, it unleashes a wave of deadly force. The Doctor discovers that the Master has harnessed the power of an alien Daemon who lay buried in the mound for millennia.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Daleks In London The Third Doctor
Writer: Robert Sloman Notes: For Season Nine, producer Barry Letts decided to bring back the Daleks, who had not starred in a Doctor Who story since The Evil Of The Daleks at the end of Season Four. The original vehicle for their return was to have been “The Daleks In London”, the storyline for which was commissioned from Sloman on May 25th, 1971, but Letts subsequently decided that the Daleks would be more effectively used in the season opener, Louis Marks' “Years Of Doom”. As such, Marks' story was rewritten as Day Of The Daleks while Sloman was asked to develop a new storyline under his original commission. This became The Time Monster.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo, UNIT
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Final story of Season Nine
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #268, DWM Special Edition #2

The Dark Dimension The Seventh Doctor
aka Lost In The Dark Dimension
Writers: Adrian Rigelsford and Joanna McCaul Notes: On June 10th, 1993 BBC Enterprises announced that it was making a direct-to-video special to celebrate Doctor Who's thirtieth anniversary. The script, originally called “Lost In The Dark Dimension” and then simply “The Dark Dimension”, was planned to be written by Rigelsford and McCaul, before Rigelsford became the sole author. He drew links with the Doctor Who: The New Adventures line of original novels from Virgin Publishing: Summerfield was a take on Professor Bernice Summerfield, the Doctor's companion introduced in the 1992 novel Love And War, while Ace's full name had been revealed to be Dorothy McShane in 1993's Set Piece. The producers of “The Dark Dimension” were to be David Jackson and Penny Mills; BBC Drama then decided to become involved with the project and former Head of Serials Peter Cregeen took Jackson's place. “The Dark Dimension” was now intended to air on BBC1 on November 28th. Former producer John Nathan-Turner was invited to participate as a consultant, but declined. Graeme Harper agreed to direct, with filming scheduled to begin on August 24th. It was hoped that either Brian Blessed or David Bowie might be cast as Hawkspur. However, the project's meagre budget meant that not all of the Doctors could play a major role, and so Rigelsford chose to showcase Tom Baker's Fourth Doctor -- who was seen as the most popular -- with a secondary role for Sylvester McCoy's Seventh Doctor. This drew objections from Jon Pertwee, Peter Davison and Colin Baker, who felt that they were being relegated to cameo appearances. At the same time, Philip Segal was negotiating a co-production agreement with the BBC to bring Doctor Who back to television on a regular basis. He felt that “The Dark Dimension” might be unflatteringly conflated with his proposal -- which would eventually bear fruit as Doctor Who (1996) -- and so the BBC chose to cancel the special on July 9th.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, the Sixth Doctor, the Fifth Doctor, the Fourth Doctor, the Third Doctor, Ace, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart
Episodes: 1 (96 minutes)
Planned For: 1993 Special
Stage Reached: Full script
Synopsis: Professor Oliver Hawkspur is running for Prime Minister, but is in fact trying to push the Earth towards an ecological crisis. Troopers from the future, led by Summerfield, arrive and encounter a schoolteacher named Dorothy McShane and her boyfriend Alex, the son of Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart. They find the Doctor, who is in his fourth incarnation because a force prevented his regeneration at the Pharos Project. He has been an amnesiac for fifteen years, but Dorothy -- really Ace -- possesses the memories of his future incarnations, which heal his mind. The Doctor now knows that they are trapped in a dark dimension: an alternate reality. Using Summerfield's technology, the Doctor opens a vortex so that he, Ace and the Brigadier can travel through time. They discover that Hawkspur was possessed by an alien entity in 1936, and also encounter the Third, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Doctors. In the present day, Hawkspur is unleashing an army of the Doctor's foes, cloned from the Time Lord's mind; he plans to eliminate humanity so that he can populate the Earth with creatures like the one that has possessed him. This entity is made of chronal energy, and used the Doctor's aborted regeneration to create the dark dimension. Alex is killed as the Doctor draws the creature out of Hawkspur's body and banishes it into the vortex. Time resets, and the Doctor regenerates back into his seventh body.
References: Doctor Who: The Nth Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #5

Dark Labyrinth The Sixth Doctor
Writer: David Banks Notes: Banks, who had played the Cyberleader since 1982's Earthshock, proposed this story idea around the time that he reprised the role for Attack Of The Cybermen. Script editor Eric Saward liked Banks' concept, but felt that it would be too costly to realise.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Darkness The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Eric Pringle Notes: This idea was submitted in August 1981 alongside The Awakening, but only the latter was developed further.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: May have involved the Daleks.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #282

The Dark Planet The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles' storyline was rejected on February 26th, 1965 because story editor Dennis Spooner feared that it hewed too closely to Malcolm Hulke's unused serial “The Hidden Planet”. In September 2013, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation of “The Dark Planet” by Matt Fitton.
Characters: The First Doctor, Ian, Barbara, Vicki
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Would have been set on a planet which is Earth's twin, orbiting on the opposite side of the Sun, whose revolution is such that one hemisphere is always dark.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Dark Samurai The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: This was an unsolicited submission to the Doctor Who production office circa 1983 from the writer of Full Circle. Script editor Eric Saward was impressed enough to commission “The First Sontarans”.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set in Japan in the early nineteenth century.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432

Death To The Doctor The Eleventh Doctor
Writer: Gareth Roberts Notes: Roberts worked on this story from about September 2008 to July 2009, at which point it was abandoned and The Lodger developed in its place. The character of Skorm was subsequently adapted by executive producer Steven Moffat and became Commander Strax, introduced in A Good Man Goes To War.
Characters: The Eleventh Doctor, Amy Pond
Episodes: 1
Planned For: Season Thirty-One
Stage Reached: Draft script
Synopsis: Involved a Sontaran named Skorm.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #27, DWM Special Edition #30

Destination: Holocaust The Seventh Doctor
Writer: David Roden Notes: When former producer John Nathan-Turner agreed to create a short 3-D Doctor Who sketch for the BBC's 1993 Children In Need charity appeal -- which would double as a celebration of Doctor Who's thirtieth anniversary -- he contacted David Roden to help develop a storyline. “Destination: Holocaust” was Roden's first attempt, but it was quickly dismissed on the grounds of cost. Nathan-Turner and Roden would instead write Dimensions In Time.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart
Episodes: 1 (5 minutes)
Planned For: 1993 Special
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: In the English countryside, the Brigadier collects the Doctor for a UNIT reunion. However, the Cybermen have been tracking the Doctor and their ship crashes nearby. The Doctor and the Brigadier take refuge in a church as the Cybermen advance towards them.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #324

Doctor Who (1995) The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: Leekley submitted his first storyline for Philip Segal's Doctor Who telefilm on July 25th, 1994, drawing heavily on the series bible they had co-created and Genesis Of The Daleks. By July 27th, the Cybs were eliminated and the Master had acquired a henchman in the form of Castellan Kelner (named after the character in The Invasion Of Time); “Castellan” subsequently became the character's name instead of his title. Later, the return to Gallifrey was eliminated by having Borusa direct the TARDIS to Skaro. The first (partial) draft of Leekley's script was delivered on August 24th. However Segal's boss, Steven Spielberg, felt that Leekley's script wasn't humorous enough, and that it veered too closely to his own Indiana Jones franchise. On September 26th, Segal was asked to replace Leekley; within a week, Robert DeLaurentis became the telefilm's writer; he would heavily revise Leekley's ideas as a new script entitled “Doctor Who?”. When the telefilm was finally made as Doctor Who (1996), Leekley requested a producer's credit, but this was rejected on the grounds that virtually none of his material had survived into the finished product.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (90 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 telefilm
Stage Reached: Full script
Synopsis: In the midst of a Dalek attack on Gallifrey, Cardinal Borusa dies -- allowing his grandson, the Master, to become President of the Time Lords. The Master's half-human half-brother, the Doctor, flees in his TARDIS, which now houses Borusa's spirit. Searching for his long-lost father Ulysses, the Doctor travels to World War II London, where he meets American WAC Lizzie Travis. Together, the Doctor and Lizzie travel back to Ancient Egypt to find the Doctor's long-lost father Ulysses, only to be attacked by cybernetic marauders called the Cybs. Ulysses is revealed to be the dead Pharoah Cheops, but he regenerates and draws the Cybs away. The TARDIS is summoned back to Gallifrey, where a suspiciously friendly Master sends the Doctor and Lizzie to Skaro to prevent Davros' creation of the Daleks. In the process, the Master takes control of the Dalek army and Davros is killed, but the Doctor destroys the Dalek incubators. The Doctor escapes and returns Lizzie to Earth, then heads off to continue his search for Ulysses.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration, Doctor Who: The Nth Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #5

Doctor Who? The Eighth Doctor
Writer: Robert DeLaurentis Notes: Around the start of October 1994, DeLaurentis replaced John Leekley as the scriptwriter for Philip Segal's Doctor Who telefilm, which was being made for broadcast by the FOX network in the United States. DeLaurentis overhauled Leekley's storyline, with the goal of making it more focussed and fun. He eliminated the notion of Borusa's spirit inhabiting the TARDIS, and the Doctor's father was no longer called Ulysses (with the alias “Doctor John Smith” later applied to the character). DeLaurentis submitted some initial notes on October 5th, a fuller outline on the 7th, and finally a partial script on the 28th. By the time his first full draft was completed on December 17th, Lizzie was renamed Jane McDonald, Winston never left World War II London, the Doctor's father had a family in 1990s America, and the Daleks were shape-shifting humanoids. This last element, in particular, was of concern to the BBC. As such, in DeLaurentis' draft of February 3rd, 1995, the Daleks were renamed the Zenons. Additionally, Borusa was renamed Pandak, and Sherman was replaced by a horned alien called Gog, who was not killed and was instead reunited with the Doctor in the late stages of the adventure. However, Segal had long been uneasy with the direction of DeLaurentis' work, and this discontent was now shared by FOX, who advocated a return to Leekley's last draft. Shortly after turning in his February 3rd script, DeLaurentis left the Doctor Who telefilm. He was replaced by Matthew Jacobs, who would write Doctor Who (1996).
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (90 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 telefilm
Stage Reached: Full script
Synopsis: The Doctor and his research assistant, Sherman, are exploring an asteroid when they are teleported to Skaro and discover that the Doctor's half-brother, the Master, has allied himself with the Daleks. Sherman is killed but the Doctor escapes back to Gallifrey, where he discovers that his grandfather, Cardinal Borusa, has been killed and the Master has seized power. The Doctor flees Gallifrey in his TARDIS and travels to World War II London in search of his long-lost father. There he meets American WAC Lizzie Travis and her bulldog Winston. Lizzie helps the Doctor discover that his father has regenerated and was captured leading an American unit which was trying to assassinate Hitler. The Doctor and Lizzie travel to the United States in the 1990s. There they find his father, who agrees to accompany them back to Gallifrey. However, he has actually been captured by the Master, who unmasks himself as the imposter. The Doctor escapes and sabotages the Master's time-travelling warship, but his half-brother gets away. The Doctor returns Lizzie to Earth before he and Winston set off in pursuit of the Master.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration, Doctor Who: The Nth Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #5

The Dogs Of Darkness The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Jack Gardner Notes: Script editor Christopher H Bidmead commissioned this storyline from Gardner on March 29th, 1980. Subsequently, Gardner was asked to expand “The Dogs Of Darkness” into full scripts, but to replace the Fourth Doctor with the Fifth Doctor, as it was now being viewed as a possible adventure for Season Nineteen. The story was still under consideration by the end of April 1981, but was abandoned sometime thereafter.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; the revised version featured the Fifth Doctor, presumably with Adric, Nyssa and Tegan)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Eighteen and Nineteen
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Don't Shoot, I'm The Doctor The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: Once Leekley had finished preparing the series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, he began to flesh out some of the story ideas proposed therein. “Don't Shoot, I'm The Doctor” was the only one to undergo substantial development, likely because Leekley was a fan of the Wild West period of American history. His storyline was based on Donald Cotton's The Gunfighters, but hewed much more closely to authentic history. Leekley also incorporated a separate legend of the West -- that of station agent Lester Moore, owner of the most famous epitaph in the Boothill Graveyard at Tombstone (which Leekley would have revealed was coined by the Doctor). Leekley thought that the feud between the Earps and the Clantons would serve as a parallel for the state of Gallifrey after the rise to power of the Doctor's half-brother, the Master. He suggested the movies Silverado and Back To The Future Part III as the episode's visual inspirations. Leekley's first storyline was delivered on May 10th, 1994, but all of his work was eventually abandoned when Matthew Jacobs was hired to start from scratch and write the Doctor Who (1996) telefilm.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor has a toothache and finds himself in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881. His search for a dentist leads him to Doc Holliday and his wife, Kate Elder, towards whom Holliday is physically abusive. The Doctor and Kate begin to fall for each other, and Kate implores the Doctor to intervene in a growing feud which pits Holliday and the Earp brothers against the Clanton gang. At night, Ike Clanton attacks the sleeping Doctor, mistaking him for Holliday. In the chaos, Ike escapes while Virgil Earp arrests the Doctor and Holliday. Holliday is freed when the Clantons ride into town, and the Doctor decides to intervene when another prisoner, Les Moore, is shot in cold blood. During the shootout at the OK Corral, the Doctor prevents Holliday from killing a helpless Ike Clanton. The Doctor and Holliday brawl; Holliday is knocked unconsciousness, while the Doctor's bothersome tooth is dislodged in the melee. The Doctor and Kate ride out of Tombstone. She leaves him at the TARDIS, and he reassures her that everything will be all right from now on.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Doomsday Contract The Fourth Doctor
aka Shylock
Writers: John Lloyd and Allan Prior Notes: Lloyd was a frequent collaborator with script editor Douglas Adams, who commissioned him to write “The Doomsday Contract” for Season Seventeen around late October 1978. Lloyd used ideas from an unfinished science-fiction novel called GiGax, and hewed to the comedic style Adams had established in The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy. After Lloyd submitted an extensive storyline for “The Doomsday Contract”, he was asked to rein in complex effects sequences and delete the Spondilas Chamber on the grounds that it was irrelevant to the plot. He also had to replace the Children of Pyxis, due to fears that child labour laws would make production difficult. Instead, he came up with a race of desert nomads-cum-mercenaries called the Wadifalayeen, although producer Graham Williams was worried that these new monsters would offend Muslims. Lloyd also recast the Plenum Trust as an altruistic conservation organisation, while the chairman of Cosmegalon was renamed Skorpios. On January 16th, 1979, however, Lloyd had to abandon “The Doomsday Contract” due to his new commitments as producer of Not The Nine O'Clock News. Still keen on the story, Adams secured Lloyd's permission for the storyline to be developed into full scripts by another writer. On February 7th he secured the services of Allan Prior, a playwright who had recently written for Blake's 7. Although Prior submitted his scripts on March 2nd, these were rejected. On August 15th, with his attention now turning to Season Eighteen, Adams again sought authorisation for another writer to be brought onto the project, which was now referred to as “Shylock”; the same permission was granted yet again on September 26th, by which time the title had reverted to “The Doomsday Contract”. However, no further development seems to have been undertaken, and with Adams' departure from Doctor Who at the end of November, it appears that “The Doomsday Contract” was dropped altogether.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K-9
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Seventeen and Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: While vacationing on Cimmerian II, the Doctor is summoned before the Altribunal of Coelare Coelum, an intergalactic court. He has been called as a witness in a millennia-old case in which the Plenum Trust Corporation (whose Executive Vice President, Smilax, is an old friend) is opposing the purchase of the Earth by Cosmegalon and its unscrupulous owner, Jugend Bruisa. Plenum had been testing the Spondilas Chamber -- an incredibly powerful device capable of polymorphing matter -- when Cosmegalon bought the Earth via dubious means. Now Smilax fears that Chamber falling into Bruisa's hands. In court, the Doctor gives evidence that the Earth is home to intelligent life, which by law would nullify Cosmegalon's ownership. He is sent to Earth to retrieve a human as proof. Arriving in mediaeval Yorkshire, the Doctor is prevented from completing his task by the monstrous Children of Pyxis, who have been despatched by Cosmegalon. Fortunately, he is saved from death by the timely intervention of Smilax, and does manage to spirit away the Spondilas Chamber. Nonetheless, with the Doctor having seemingly failed, the court rules in Cosmegalon's favour. However, the Doctor tricks Bruisa and the Children of Pyxis into travelling to modern-day Earth near a missile base, where their ship is annihilated.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #218-219, DWM Special Edition #9

Doomwraiths The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Philip Martin Notes: Martin submitted this idea on December 28th, 1983, while awaiting feedback on Season Twenty-Two's Vengeance On Varos. It was inspired by the theories of astronomer and author Sir Fred Hoyle, who posited that the origins of life on Earth lay in outer space. On March 9th, 1984, script editor Eric Saward noted that more development would be needed before he could properly assess “Doomwraiths”; the notion was not pursued further.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Millennia ago, the Doomwraiths seeded the Earth with their own genetic code in order to save their dying species. Now the Doomwraiths have reemerged to discover that life on Earth did not evolve to their design. The Doctor and Peri must stop the Doomwraiths from recovering their genetic code and destroying the human race.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #309

The Doppelgangers see Shield Of Zarak

Dragons Of Fear see Erinella

The Dreamers Of Phados The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: After “The Silent Scream” was rejected in early 1975, this was one of the storylines Boucher worked on with producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on a colony ship which has been home to a civilisation spanning many generations.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #229, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Dreamspinner The Second Doctor
Writer: Paul Wheeler Notes: Wheeler was commissioned to write a four-part story breakdown on February 23rd, 1968. The story had been expanded to six episodes by the time the first installment was requested on March 13th. “The Dreamspinner” was intended to be Serial WW, the second story into production during the sixth recording block (and therefore the fourth story of Season Six). However, Wheeler's script for part one was not to the satisfaction of the production office, and it was abandoned on April 9th. The Invasion was extended to eight episodes as a result.
Characters: The Second Doctor (with Jamie and Zoe?)
Episodes: 6 (initially 4)
Planned For: Fourth story of Season Six
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Involved a person with the power to make others believe that their dreams are real.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4, The Doctors: 30 Years Of Time Travel

Earth Aid The Seventh Doctor
aka Bad Destination
Writer: Ben Aaronovitch Notes: During the summer of 1988, Aaronovitch and script editor Andrew Cartmel collaborated on War World, an ultimately unused script for the Doctor Who stage play which became The Ultimate Adventure. When considering ideas for Season Twenty-Seven, they decided to revive an alien race created for War World called the Metatraxi. The likely season premiere would have been that year's three-part, studiobound serial. However, Aaronovitch had only roughed out the script for the first scene and developed vague ideas about the rest of the storyline when Doctor Who was cancelled in September 1989. At this point, the adventure was untitled; it was dubbed “Earth Aid” by Doctor Who Magazine in 1997, although “Bad Destination” was also later proposed. “Earth Aid” was eventually adapted by Aaronovitch and Cartmel as an audio play, released by Big Finish Productions in July 2011.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, Ace
Episodes: 3
Planned For: Probably the first story of Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Ace poses as the captain of a spaceship in a conflict against the Metatraxi, alien insectoid creatures with a Samurai-like code of honour.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #255, DWM #433, DWM Special Edition #10

Earthshock The Eighth Doctor
Writer: John Leekley Notes: This was one of several storylines which appeared in Leekley's series bible for Philip Segal's version of Doctor Who, released on March 21st, 1994. It was based on Eric Saward's Earthshock.
Characters: A reimagined version of the First Doctor
Episodes: 1 (45 minutes)
Planned For: 1995 series
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In modern-day Wyoming, the Doctor investigates the murder of a team of palaeontologists in a cave system. The culprits are the Cybs -- cybernetic pirates -- who have planted a bomb which can destroy the Earth. The Doctor deactivates the bomb and traces its command signal to a space freighter, which the Cybs intend to crash into the Earth.
References: Doctor Who: Regeneration

The Elite The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg submitted this idea in late 1982 after completing Enlightenment, but it was not pursued. In October 2011, Big Finish Productions released an audio adaptation “The Elite” by John Dorney.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands in a city embroiled in a protracted war. Most of the population is very young, and has been bred for intelligence to give them a strategic advantage. Appalled, the Doctor is branded a war criminal but saved by the twelve year-old General Aubron. They join forces with savages on the surface of the planet who turn out to be people banished from the city because they were not sufficiently intelligent. Together, they assault the bunker of the ruling High Priest. The High Priest turns out to be a Dalek who crashlanded on the planet centuries earlier, and who has been manipulating the society to elevate them to the point where they will make it possible for the Dalek to return to Skaro.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #267, DWM Special Edition #3

The Endgame The Seventh Doctor
Writer: David Roden Notes: In July 1993, it appeared that Dimensions In Time -- the proposed thirtieth-anniversary Doctor Who sketch designed to air as part of the BBC's Children In Need charity telethon -- would have to be scrapped due to issues with the planned crossover involving characters and locations from the soap opera EastEnders. Roden developed “The Endgame” in its place; he had recently appeared with Michael Gough in the play Wittgenstein and believed that the actor would be willing to reprise his eponymous role from 1966's The Celestial Toymaker. Roden hoped that the special could be filmed at Dreamland in Margate, while production manager Gary Downie thought that permission could be granted to use Chessington World of Adventures for free. However, “The Endgame” was dropped when the EastEnders situation was resolved.
Characters: The Seventh Doctor, the Sixth Doctor, the Fifth Doctor, the Fourth Doctor, the Third Doctor, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart
Episodes: 2 (5 minutes)
Planned For: 1993 Special
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: The Celestial Toymaker has captured the Doctor's earlier incarnations, whom he wants to possess and turn into more Toymakers. The Seventh Doctor agrees to compete against the Toymaker in a game, with all of his lives at stake. Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart and UNIT must locate the TARDIS in a funfair guarded by Cybermen. When the Brigadier wins the game, the Doctors join together to attack the Toymaker. The Brigadier takes advantage of the opportunity to shoot the Toymaker, who is sucked into the sphere he had used to hold the Doctors captive. The earlier Doctors are returned to their proper place in the timestream, while the Seventh Doctor and the Brigadier plan to deposit the sphere in a black hole, trapping the Toymaker forever.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #324

End Of Term see Paradise Five

The Enemy Within The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Christopher Priest Notes: To make up for the rejection of “Sealed Orders”, which had been abandoned in June 1980, Priest was commissioned to storyline “The Enemy Within” on December 5th of that year. By the time full scripts were requested on February 6th, 1981, it had been decided that Priest's serial would culminate in the death of Adric, whom producer John Nathan-Turner felt was not working out as a companion. Around the middle of June, a disagreement about rewrite fees and a vitriolic exchange with Nathan-Turner led to Priest's refusal to perform requested rewrites on “The Enemy Within”. It was hastily replaced by Earthshock, while Priest's scripts were formally abandoned on July 17th.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The sixth serial of Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a monster at the heart of the TARDIS which embodies the Doctor's deepest fears. The story featured characters called Timewrights, and ended with Adric's demise.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #239, DWM #292, DWM Special Edition #1

Erinella The Fourth Doctor
aka Dragons Of Fear
Writer: Pennant Roberts Notes: Roberts, who had directed several stories (most recently The Pirate Planet), began working on “Dragons Of Fear” in the fall of 1978, drawing on elements of both Celtic folklore and the Welsh language. A script commission followed on January 10th, 1979, with a view to making it the fifth serial of Season Seventeen (the slot eventually occupied by The Horns Of Nimon). However, “Dragons Of Fear” would have to be an expensive production, and it soon became clear that the Doctor Who budget would not stretch to afford both it and City Of Death. The story was dropped around February, by which time it had been retitled “Erinella” (which roughly translates as “Another Ireland” in Gaelic). In January 1980, “Erinella” was recommissioned, with the intention of inserting it into Season Eighteen (possibly as the penultimate serial, since Roberts was told that he would have to replace Romana with new companion Adric). However, incoming script editor Christopher H Bidmead wanted to ground Doctor Who in more realistic science, which was at odds with the premise of “Erinella”. Bidmead suggested several major changes to the storyline, but by now Roberts was fatigued with the process, and disinterested in pursuing the project further. In the mid-Eighties, Roberts resubmitted “Erinella” to script editor Eric Saward, but nothing came of this.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K-9 (original submission; the resubmission replaced Romana and K-9 with Adric)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: The fifth serial of Season Seventeen; Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The Doctor, Romana and K-9 arrive on the planet Erinella. There, the Doctor is immediately arrested and accused of poisoning a local noble. Indeed, everyone seems to recognise him, despite the fact that he's never been to Erinella before. Romana and K-9 retreat to the woods where they meet Og, the keeper of Erinella's dragons. Meanwhile, the Doctor discovers that the true murderer is a Queen who is scheming to control all of Erinella. Moreover, he has accidentally arrived on the planet later than he was meant to. He escapes and travels back in time to set in motion the events that he has already witnessed. Romana convinces Og to send the dragons against the Queen, while the Doctor tricks her into confessing her crimes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #248, DWM Special Edition #9

The Evil Eye The First Doctor
Writer: Geoffrey Orme Notes: “The Evil Eye” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Eye In Space The Second Doctor
Writer: Victor Pemberton Notes: Doctor Who producer Peter Bryant asked Pemberton to develop a new idea shortly after completing Fury From The Deep in late 1967. When Bryant left Doctor Who in early 1969, Pemberton decided not to pursue the story, and it was not formally commissioned.
Characters: The Second Doctor (with Jamie and Zoe?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Six
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Concerned an omniscient octopoid eye in space which drew things toward it.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #318, DWM Special Edition #4

The Eyes Of Nemesis The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles submitted this storyline on May 16th, 1975.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Monster Of Peladon DVD production notes

The Face Of God The First Doctor
Writer: John Wiles Notes: Wiles appears to have contemplated this idea while he served as producer of Doctor Who in 1965.
Characters: The First Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Season Three
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: In space, a massive countenance materialises in front of the TARDIS; the being claims to be God, but this is eventually revealed to be a hoax.
References: Doctor Who: The Sixties

Farer Nohan The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Stephenson Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 18th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

Farewell Great Macedon The First Doctor
aka Alexander The Great
Writer: Moris Farhi Notes: Although a sample script written by Farhi, “The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance”, was rejected by story editor David Whitaker, he was nonetheless encouraged to continue to develop ideas for Doctor Who. Aware that Farhi was interested in Greco-Roman mythology, on January 24th, 1964 Whitaker suggested an adventure about the Greek pirate Barbarossa, in which the Doctor would be forced to invite somebody into the TARDIS. Farhi instead began work on “Farewell Great Macedon” (also called “Alexander The Great ”); such was his enthusiasm for the project that he ignored Whitaker's advice to write only one script and instead produced a full six-part serial. His episodes bore the titles 1. The Hanging Gardens Of Babylon, 2. The Wrath Of The Greatest Grecian Of Them All! or O, Son! My Son!, 3. A Man Must Die, 4. The World Lies Dead At Your Feet, 5. In The Arena, 6. Farewell, Great Macedon!. The first episode, notably, would have explained the time travellers' ability to understand other languages by showing them hooked up to a computer which teaches them Ancient Greek. Initially, Whitaker felt that Farhi's scripts simply needed tightening up, but after the transmission of Marco Polo, the production office apparently elected to gear the historical adventures such that they were set on the periphery, rather than in the midst, of famous historical events, in response to criticism from schools (although this must have been abandoned by the time The Romans was made less than a year later). Farhi was unwilling to rewrite his storyline to reflect this edict, and so “Farewell Great Macedon” was abandoned on July 31st. In November 2010, Big Finish Production released an audio adaptation of “Farewell Great Macedon” by John Dorney.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS materialises amidst the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, where the Doctor and his companions meet Alexander the Great. Four members of Alexander's retinue, however, are plotting to murder the king and his successors so that one of their number, Seleucus, can ascend to the throne and allow them to return to their homeland. The conspirators try to frame the time travellers, but the Doctor and Ian succeed in a series of trials and Alexander's bodyguard, Ptolemy, proves their innocence. However, history cannot be changed, and despite the Doctor's efforts to save the king's life by having Ian build an iron lung, Alexander dies while Ptolemy helps the companions escape to the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #294

The Female Of The Species see The Prison In Space

The Final Game The Third Doctor
Writer: Robert Sloman Notes: Created in response to Roger Delgado's desire for the Master to be written out of Doctor Who -- because his attachment to the programme was making it difficult for him to find other work -- a storyline for “The Final Game” was commissioned on February 15th, 1973, and was inspired in part by producer Barry Letts' interest in Eastern philosophy. “The Final Game” had to be abandoned when Delgado died in a car accident while filming in Turkey on June 18th. In its place, Sloman developed Planet Of The Spiders instead.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: The final serial of Season Eleven
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and the Master are revealed to be two aspects of the same person -- the Master representing the “id” (instinctual needs and desires) and the Doctor the “ego” (conscious perception of and adaptation to reality). The Master ultimately perishes in an explosion which saves the lives of the Doctor and others; it remains unclear if this was a final act of redemption on the villain's part.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #314

Fires Of The Starmind The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Marc Platt Notes: This was an unsolicited submission made to script editor Robert Holmes in late 1975. Holmes felt that it lacked action and drama, and was in need of a proper antagonist. Nonetheless, he thought that “Fires Of The Starmind” had more potential than most amateur submissions and encouraged Platt to continue writing. “Fires Of The Starmind” was rejected on December 15th, but after numerous attempts, Platt would finally earn a Doctor Who credit on Ghost Light in 1989.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane, Harry
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Complete(?) script
Synopsis: Information in the Time Lord libraries is stored on photons. A sentient star uses this as a means of invading Gallifrey.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #305

The First Sontarans The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: Smith, who had written Full Circle for Season Eighteen, was commissioned to provide a storyline for “The First Sontarans” on January 10th, 1984 after impressing script editor Eric Saward with two unsolicted ideas entitled “The Dark Samurai” and “The Metraki”. However, Smith's concept was abandoned in mid-February when it was decided that Robert Holmes, the creator of the Sontarans, would revisit them in The Two Doctors. Smith later adapted “The First Sontarans” as an audio script for Big Finish Productions, released in July 2012.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: 2 (45-minute)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Forthcoming
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432, DWM Special Edition #3

Flipback see Iceberg

The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance The First Doctor
Writer: Moris Farhi Notes: On January 6th, 1964, Farhi contacted story editor David Whitaker about writing for Doctor Who. Whitaker commissioned a script for one episode, which became “The Fragile Yellow Arc Of Fragrance”. Whitaker rejected this on the 24th, feeling its subject matter was unsuitable for Doctor Who, but encouraged Farhi to continue to develop ideas for the programme. In November 2010, Big Finish Production released an audio adaptation of “The Fragrant Yellow Arc Of Fragrance” by John Dorney.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 1
Planned For: Season One
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: On an alien planet, a man named Rhythm woos Barbara. She is unaware, however, that her rejection of his advances mean that Rhythm is now sentenced to die.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

The Furies see The Space War

A-F G-L M-Q R-Z Untitled