Doctor Who: The Lost Stories (M-Q)
A-F G-L M-Q R-Z Untitled

The Macro Men The Fifth Doctor The Sixth Doctor
aka The Macros
Writers: Ingrid Pitt and Tony Rudlin Notes: Pitt had just appeared in Season Twenty-One's Warriors Of The Deep when she and her husband, Rudlin, submitted several story ideas to the Doctor Who production office. Of those, only “The Macro Men” -- inspired by the 1979 conspiracy theory text The Philadelphia Experiment: Project Invisibility by William L Moore and Charles Berlitz -- seems to have been pursued. This was conceived as a Fifth Doctor story, but was refashioned for the Sixth Doctor by the time the script for the first episode was commissioned on January 19th, 1984. During the drafting stage, the adventure's title was amended to “The Macros”, but although Pitt and Rudlin worked closely with script editor Eric Saward, the project did not proceed further. In 2010, however, an audio version of “The Macros” was released by Big Finish Productions.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor (original version), the Sixth Doctor (later version), Peri
Episodes: 4 (original version), 2 (45-minute; revised version)
Planned For: Season Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Forthcoming
Buy: Canada · UK
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #3

The Macros see The Macro Men

The Man From The Met The First Doctor
Writer: George Kerr Notes: This idea was submitted around the start of April 1966 and rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Four, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

Manpower The Fifth Doctor The Sixth Doctor
aka May Time, Children's Seth, The Children Of Seth
Writer: Christopher Bailey Notes: After Bailey completed work on Snakedance, he was commissioned to write a storyline called “May Time” on August 24th, 1982. Full scripts were then requested on September 16th, by which time the adventure had become known as “Manpower”. This was apparently dropped, but on August 15th, 1983, Bailey was commissioned to write a set of scripts for the Sixth Doctor entitled “The Children Of Seth” (originally given the apparently erroneous title “Children's Seth”), which he recalls as being a revised version of “Manpower”. By this time, Doctor Who was in the process of shifting from 25-minute to 45-minute episodes. Bailey had trouble devising a structure for his story, and found himself unable to come up with an appropriate nemesis for the Doctor. Disillusioned by the lack of collaboration he was receiving from the Doctor Who production office, Bailey decided to withdraw from the television industry.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, presumably with Tegan and Turlough (original submission); the Sixth Doctor and Peri (resubmission)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Seasons Twenty-One and Twenty-Two
Stage Reached: Script
Synopsis: Set in the court of Byzantium.
Buy: Canada · UK
References: Doctor Who Magazine #s 227, 327, DWM Special Edition #s 1, 3, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Mark Of Lumos The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Keith Miles Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 14th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Masters Of Luxor The First Doctor
aka The Robots
Writer: Anthony Coburn Notes: When Coburn's 100,000 BC, Doctor Who's original second serial, was pushed ahead to replace “The Giants” in June 1963, Coburn was commissioned on June 18th to supply a replacement second story as well, to be directed by Rex Tucker. When Coburn left the BBC to become a freelance writer, the serial had to be recommissioned; this happened on July 3rd, by which time it had gained the title “The Robots” and had been expanded from four to six episodes. “The Robots” was originally set on thirtieth-century Earth, but by the end of the month its location had been shifted to an alien planet. The production team grew increasingly unhappy with “The Robots”, however, and on September 23rd decided to switch it in the running order with the intended fifth story, The Daleks. The following month, the scripts gained a new title, “The Masters Of Luxor”. Around the start of 1964, “Luxor” was postponed until Season Two, at one point being considered for the sixth slot of Doctor Who's second production block. By the end of the year, however, the decision had been made to drop “The Masters Of Luxor” from the schedule altogether. The episode titles for the serial were: 1. The Cannibal Flower, 2. The Mockery Of A Man, 3. A Light On The Dead Planet, 4. Tabon Of Luxor, 5. An Infinity Of Surprises, 6. The Flower Blooms (originally The Flower In Bloom).
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 4 (original submission); 6 (resubmission)
Planned For: Seasons One and Two
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS is drawn by a signal to one of the moons of Luxor. There they discover the world dominated by robots led by the Perfect One. The Perfect One has been experimenting on people to discover the secret of life, and kidnaps Barbara and Susan; he plans to use them as test subjects before draining their life force. The Doctor and Ian escape to the wilderness, where they find and reawaken Tabon, the scientist who invented the Perfect One. Tabon confronts the Perfect One, sending the robots out of control. The robots kill Tabon and destroy the Perfect One while the time travellers escape in the TARDIS.
References: Doctor Who: The Scripts: The Masters Of Luxor, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine #331, DWM Special Edition #7

The Masters Of Zenos see The Prison In Space

May Time see Manpower

The Mega The Third Doctor
Writer: Bill Strutton Notes: In 1970, more than five years after completing The Web Planet, Strutton approached the Doctor Who office about writing for the series again. On September 25th, he submitted the storyline for “The Mega”, which was retroactively commissioned on October 19th. Although Strutton worked on the project for a number of weeks, the idea was eventually discarded.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eight
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #286, DWM Special Edition #2

The Menday Fault The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Wiltshire Notes: In late 1975 or early 1976, Wiltshire, a dentist and magazine editor, submitted a detailed but unsolicited storyline for “The Menday Fault” to the Doctor Who production office. The idea was not pursued.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Thirteen or Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor and Sarah Jane join the crew of the Thor, an experimental nuclear submarine attempting to set a new depth record by entering the Fault of Menday in the Bermuda Triangle. The Fault turns out to be a passageway to a subterranean world, and the Thor is captured by a race called the Suranians, led by Zorr. The Suranians' world is lit by a glowing cloud of gas that is beginning to fade, and so Zorr wants to use the Polaris missiles aboard the Thor to invade the surface world. He threatens Sarah's life to force the Doctor's cooperation, but she is saved by Nephus, a merman-like Trelw. Nephus' people are being mind-controlled by the Suranians, but the Doctor manages to destroy the transmitter, inciting a rebellion. Nephus kills Zorr, and the Thor is able to the return to the surface world.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #292, DWM Special Edition #8

The Mentor Conspiracy The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Chris Boucher Notes: After “The Silent Scream” was rejected in early 1975, this was one of the storylines Boucher worked on with producer Philip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes. It included the characters of Leela and Andor, who would eventually appear in The Face Of Evil. “The Mentor Conspiracy” underwent some development, but was ultimately turned down on October 30th, 1975.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Leela
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Fourteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set on a colony ship which has been home to a civilisation spanning many generations.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #229, DWM Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Metraki The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Andrew Smith Notes: This was an unsolicited submission to the Doctor Who production office circa 1983 from the writer of Full Circle. Script editor Eric Saward was impressed enough to commission “The First Sontarans”.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Probably Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #432

A Midwinter's Tale The Tenth Doctor
Writers: Russell T Davies, Phil Ford Notes: The basic idea of a person (originally, the father of the family) suddenly finding himself alone in a deserted hotel at Christmas was a potential storyline Davies conceived for the 2008 Christmas special, a spot eventually taken by The Next Doctor. Some months later, he decided to revisit it for what was intended to be the 2009 Christmas special, which he would be cowriting with Ford. Davies also drew upon elements of a second Christmas 2008 idea, in which the Earth is transformed into a fantasy landscape generated by the dormant mind of Harry Potter author JK Rowling. The character of the grandmother grew out of Davies' desire to include a strong, older female as one of the temporary companions featured in the 2009 specials. Ford took these ideas and developed a storyline called “A Midwinter's Tale”. However, Davies was already beginning to have misgivings about the adventure, as he feared that it would be impractical to stage a deserted London and was unsure that the notion could generate enough incident for a one-hour special. After reading Ford's treatment, he decided that the fantasy element was too strong, and concluded that “A Midwinter's Tale” represented a “dead end” for the special. He had already devised a replacement idea, and this evolved into The Waters Of Mars. The essential idea for “A Midwinter's Tale” was ultimately used as the basis for The Empty Planet, part of the fourth season of The Sarah Jane Adventures.
Characters: The Eleventh Doctor, “Gran”
Episodes: 1 (60-minute)
Planned For: Second 2009 special
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A grandmother is trapped in a posh hotel with her unruly family. Wishing that they'd all just disappear, she storms out of their suite to fetch some ice, only to find the corridors deserted. Returning to her rooms, she discovers that her family has indeed disappeared -- but so has all of humanity. Finally, she comes upon the TARDIS and the Doctor. Investigating, they discover eight-legged centaur-like creatures abroad in London. It transpires that aliens from another dimension, the Shi'ar, have frozen time on Earth in order to hold a festival celebrating the marriage of their queen. The life of the grandmother's family becomes endangered, culminating in a race through secret tunnels beneath Buckingham Palace.
References: Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale -- The Final Chapter

The Mists Of Madness The Third Doctor
Writer: Brian Wright Notes: Script editor Terrance Dicks commissioned the storyline from Wright on February 17th, 1969, and it was submitted on May 9th. Subsequently, however, Wright took up an academic writing post in Bristol, leaving him with no time to complete work on “The Mists Of Madness”, which was then dropped from the schedule.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Liz
Episodes: 7
Planned For: Final story of Season Seven
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor discovers an artificially-created human community.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2

More Deadly Than The Male see The Prison In Space

Mouth Of Grath The Fourth Doctor
Writers: Malcolm Edwards and Leroy Kettle Notes: This storyline was commissioned on March 18th, 1980.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who: The Eighties

The Mutant The Second Doctor
Writer: Barry Letts Notes: Letts submitted this idea around November 1966, when it was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis. Later, when Letts was the producer of Doctor Who, he suggested that writers Bob Baker and Dave Martin incorporate elements of this concept into a story of their own, which became The Mutants.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Presumably Seasons Four or Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Concerned a race of creatures which underwent dramatic mutations, like a caterpillar evolving into a butterfly, over the span of their lifetimes.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #230, DWM Special Edition #4

Multiface The Third Doctor
Writer: Godfrey Harrison Notes: This was an experimental storyline commissioned by producer Barry Letts on July 19th, 1971 while script editor Terrance Dicks was on holiday. Although considerable development was undertaken, Letts eventually decided that “Multiface” was turning out to be more fantastical than he felt appropriate for Doctor Who, and it was abandoned on February 25th, 1972.
Characters: The Third Doctor, Jo
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Seasons Nine or Ten
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Nazis The First Doctor
Writer: Brian Hayles Notes: Hayles was commissioned to write a storyline for “The Nazis” on March 8th, 1966. Shortly thereafter, however, he was engaged to write The Smugglers, which he was told should take a higher priority. “The Nazis” was ultimately abandoned on June 15th, with the sentiment being that the events it portrayed were too close to the present day.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #321, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The New Armada The First Doctor
Writer: David Whitaker Notes: By late February 1964, story editor Whitaker had decided to write one of the first recording block's final serials himself. Gerald Blake was allocated to direct. Not long after, though, he began casting about for a replacement for this untitled Armada story, eventually finding it in the form of The Reign Of Terror. By mid-April, Whitaker was considering using his Armada tale as the first serial of Doctor Who's second production block (so that it would have been broadcast after The Dalek Invasion Of Earth), although this did not ultimately come to pass. Long afterward, having since left the programme, Whitaker submitted a storyline entitled “The New Armada” -- presumably a revised version of his original idea -- to the Doctor Who production office. This was rejected on January 17th, 1966 by then-story editor Gerry Davis, who felt it was too complex, with a preponderance of characters and subplots. Nonetheless, Davis invited Whitaker to submit further ideas, eventually leading to Whitaker writing The Power Of The Daleks.
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Ian, Barbara
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Seasons One, Two and Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Set in sixteenth-century Spain after the Armada.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The New Machines The Second Doctor
Writer: Roger Dixon Notes: This idea was submitted on January 16th, 1967.
Characters: The Second Doctor
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: A race of people created powerful robots but were subsequently wiped out. The robots have now become so advanced that they are, in turn, able to create a new race of people. They fear that these new humans will dominate them, and see the arrival of the Doctor on their planet as confirmation of their fears.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4

Nightmare Country The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Stephen Gallagher Notes: Gallagher submitted this storyline in late 1982, after finishing work on Season Twenty's Terminus. It was rejected on grounds of cost.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor agrees to let a race of beings called the Engineers make some repairs to the TARDIS. In return, he offers himself as a test subject for a Reality Simulator, constructed by a Master Engineer called Konis. The simulation is intended to be benign, but the Doctor finds himself amnesiac on a graveyard-like world overrun by the sinister Vodyani. In the TARDIS, Tegan and Turlough learn that the Reality Simulator actually generates a genuine alternate reality. Tegan enters the Simulator and frees the Doctor, but the Vodyani have found a way out of the machine as well. It transpires that the Vodyani were accidentally created by the mind of Konis' apprentice, Volos, who is now merging with the Vodyani leader. Volos sacrifices himself to stop the Vodyani, and Konis destroys the Reality Simulator.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #296, DWM Special Edition #3

Nightmare Planet The Fourth Doctor
, The Doctors: 30 Years Of Time Travel
Writer: Dennis Spooner Notes: Spooner's storyline commission came on January 31st, 1975, followed by a request for full scripts on February 4th. Script editor Robert Holmes became unhappy with the drugs element of Spooner's serial, and it was dropped.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a planet where the populace is unknowingly subjugated with drugs in their food and water. Misdeeds are punished with the temporary suppression of the drugs, which causes the people to see terrible monsters all around them.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The 1920s The Tenth Doctor
Writer: Stephen Fry Notes: Fry had been associated with Doctor Who via his role as the Minister of Chance in the webcast Death Comes To Time before being invited to contribute to the new Doctor Who series' second season. The 1920s setting was inspired by his screenplay for the 2003 feature film Bright Young Things. In development from about June 2005, “The 1920s” was intended to form part of the season's sixth production block. By November, however, it was realised that Fry's script would be too much of a drain on the programme's budget late in the year, and the decision was made to defer it to the 2007 season; it was replaced by Fear Her. However, the script would have to undergo rewrites -- not least to replace Rose Tyler with Martha Jones -- and Fry was now occupied with other commitments. By mid-2006, “The 1920s” was withdrawn from the schedule altogether.
Characters: The Tenth Doctor, Rose
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Eleventh episode of Season Twenty-Eight; Season Twenty-Nine
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Concerned a popular British legend which turns out to have an extraterrestrial connection.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #14

Nothing At The End Of The Lane The First Doctor
Writer: CE Webber Notes: Barely even rating as a “lost” story, this was the title for Doctor Who's first episode suggested by Webber in the programme's developing format guide, circa early May 1963. Biddy, Lola and Cliff would eventually become Susan, Barbara and Ian, while the idea of the Doctor being explicitly referred to as “Dr. Who” would go effectively unused. Series creator Sydney Newman also disliked the idea of the Ship being invisible. “Nothing At The End Of The Lane” would be replaced by “The Giants”.
Characters: Dr. Who, Biddy, Cliff, Lola
Episodes: 1
Planned For: The first episode of Season One
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Teenager Biddy and her teachers Lola and Cliff meet a strange, amnesiac old man and discover his invisible time machine.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #208, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Ocean Liner The First Doctor
Writer: David Ellis Notes: “The Ocean Liner” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on April 4th, 1966.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Steven and Dodo?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: A spy thriller.
References: Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor, Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #7

Operation Werewolf The Second Doctor
Writers: Douglas Camfield and Robert Kitts Notes: Camfield, who had most recently directed The Daleks' Master Plan, worked on the storyline with Kitts during 1965. It was finally submitted to the Doctor Who production office on September 18th, 1967, inviting response from producer Innes Lloyd on October 3rd. Taking on board Lloyd's suggestions, Camfield and Kitts composed a script for episode one, but “Operation: Werewolf” was thereafter dropped. Although the practise had been abandoned by that point in time, the authors nonetheless allocated an individual title to each installment; these were The Secret Army, Chateau Of Death, Lair Of The Werewolf, Friend Or Foe, Village Of The Swastika and Crossfire.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria
Episodes: 6
Planned For: Season Five
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: The TARDIS lands in Normandy, France on June 1st, 1944 -- five days before D-Day. The Doctor discovers that the Nazis are developing a way to teleport troops across the English Channel: the so-called “Operation Werewolf”. To stop the Nazis, the Doctor allies himself with the Resistance -- including Fergus McCrimmon, a descendant of Jamie's -- but must first uncover the traitors within.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #4

Parasites The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Bill Lyons Notes: Lyons, who had written for Blake's 7, was commissioned to provide a storyline for “Parasites” (also referred to as “The Parasites”) on September 22nd, 1981. Scripts were commissioned on February 16th and April 23rd, 1982, but the story ultimately went unmade.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Tegan (presumably with Nyssa and/or Turlough)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty or Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

The People Who Couldn't Remember The First Doctor
Writers: David Ellis and Malcolm Hulke Notes: After being submitted in April 1966, the satirical “The People Who Couldn't Remember” was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on June 15th. Davis wanted to avoid outright comedies in the wake of the poor reception of The Gunfighters.
Characters: The First Doctor (with Polly and Ben?)
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Four
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine #212, DWM Special Edition #7, Doctor Who: The Handbook: The First Doctor

The Place Of Serenity see The Guardians Of Prophecy

The Place Where All Times Meet The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Colin Davis Notes: A storyline was commissioned from Davis -- who had written for Blake's 7 -- on June 10th, 1982. Davis' idea was apparently not pursued beyond this point.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Point Of Entry The Sixth Doctor
Writer: Barbara Clegg Notes: Clegg, who had written Enlightenment, submitted this idea circa early 1985, but it was not taken up by the production team. Clegg and Marc Platt (who wrote Ghost Light) adapted “Point Of Entry” as an audio adventure, released by Big Finish Productions in 2010.
Characters: The Sixth Doctor, Peri
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-Three
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: In England around 1590, the Doctor and Peri meet Christopher Marlowe, who is writing The Tragical History Of Doctor Faustus. Marlowe has been assisted by a Spaniard named Velez, who claims to be an immortal alchemist. Investigating, the Doctor learns that Velez has been possessed by an Omn -- a member of the Omnim, a race whose conscience was preserved in an asteroid when their planet was destroyed. Part of this asteroid became a meteorite which fell to Earth in South America, where the Omn inspired the legend of the Aztec god Quetzacoatl. Velez acquires a knife made from the meteorite which can inspire rage in anyone nearby, and which will allow him to bring the remaining Omnim to Earth. The Doctor discovers that the Omnim are suspectible to sound at a certain frequency, and with Marlowe's help succeeds in destroying the Omn and the knife, averting the invasion.
Buy: Canada · UK
References: Doctor Who Magazine #276, DWM Special Edition #3

Poison The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Rod Beacham Notes: Beacham was commissioned to write a storyline for “Poison” on April 27th, 1982, with full scripts contracted exactly a month later, on May 27th.
Characters: Presumably the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Turlough
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Twenty-One
Stage Reached: Script, possibly complete
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #1, Doctor Who: The Eighties

Pompeii The Ninth Doctor
Writer: Russell T Davies Notes: In casting about for a budget-saving storyline for the penultimate adventure of Doctor Who's first season back on the air, executive producer Davies briefly considered “Pompeii” after watching the BBC broadcast of the docudrama Pompeii: The Last Day in October 2003. It was eventually replaced by Boom Town, while the notion of setting a story in Pompeii was ultimately given to James Moran to develop for The Fires Of Pompeii three years later.
Characters: The Ninth Doctor, Rose, Jack
Episodes: 1 (45-minute)
Planned For: Eleventh episode of Season Twenty-Seven
Stage Reached: Story idea
Synopsis: Involved the destruction of the Roman city of Pompeii following the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #11

The Prisoner Of Time The Fourth Doctor
Writer: Barry Letts Notes: Letts was commissioned to write this storyline on January 21st, 1975, exactly one day before he was contracted to direct The Android Invasion. Letts based “The Prisoner Of Time” on the audition piece he had written for the purpose of casting the role of Sarah Jane Smith in 1973. Although scripts were subsequently requested, producer Philip Hinchcliffe was unhappy with Letts' initial draft of episode one, demanding numerous alterations. Letts was unable to come up with a revised version which was acceptable to the production team, and “The Prisoner Of Time” was abandoned.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Sarah Jane Smith
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Thirteen
Stage Reached: Script for episode one
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #8, Doctor Who: The Seventies

The Prison In Space The Second Doctor
aka The Amazons, The Female Of The Species, The Lady Killers, The Masters Of Zenos, More Deadly Than The Male, The Revolutionaries, The Strange Suffragettes (whew!)
Writer: Dick Sharples Notes: Concerned that Doctor Who was becoming too serious, producer Peter Bryant asked humour writer Dick Sharples to contribute to the series. A story breakdown for “The Amazons” -- intended to be the first outright Doctor Who comedy since 1965's The Romans -- was commissioned on April 24th, 1968. It was intended to be made as Serial WW, replacing an unknown story which had, in turn, replaced “The Dreamspinner”. After suggesting a host of alternative titles, Sharples' adventure became “The Prison In Space” in May; the scripts were commissioned on June 4th. Sharples was told that Frazer Hines intended to leave Doctor Who with Serial WW and so “The Prison In Space” should now write out Jamie and introduce a new companion, Nik, who had been created by producer Peter Bryant and story editor Derrick Sherwin. In September, Hines changed his mind about how early he would be leaving Doctor Who, and Sharples agreed to rewrite the scripts appropriately. Both the production team and the assigned director, David Maloney, were now becoming unhappy with “The Prison In Space”, however, particularly scenes such as one where Jamie dresses up in drag to masquerade as a Dolly Guard. In late September, Sharples informed Bryant that he would not perform any further rewrites on the serial, as he felt he had already done the work requested of him and the production office was now changing their expectations. On October 7th, The Krotons was chosen to replace “The Prison In Space” as Serial WW, despite the fact that Barrie Gosney had already been cast in the latter (possibly as Albert). Despite a series of discussions with Sharples, Bryant finally elected to abandon “The Prison In Space” on October 15th.
Characters: The Second Doctor, Jamie, Zoe
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Fourth story of Season Six
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: The TARDIS materialises on a planet where women have ruled for the past five centuries; they have disenfranchised men, banned war, and developed a way to extend their lifespans so that procreation is no longer imperative. The Doctor and Jamie are arrested and sentenced by President Babs to a prison satellite controlled by the Dolly Guards. They quickly recruit their cellmates -- Albert, Garth and Mervyn -- into helping them foment a resistance movement. Meanwhile, Babs brainwashes Zoe and sends her to the satellite as an ostensible ambassador. Once there, though, Zoe betrays the Doctor and Jamie, and they and their collaborators are put on a rocket destined for a remote planet. However, prior to her conditioning, Zoe told other women about the way males and females coexist on Earth, and this incites a revolution against Babs. The newly enlightened women rescue the Doctor; Jamie frees Zoe from her brainwashing by smacking her behind.
Buy: Canada · UK
References: Doctor Who Magazine #198, DWM #199, DWM Special Edition #4, The Doctor Who Chronicles: Season Six

Project “4G” see Project Zeta-Sigma

Project Zeta Plus see Project Zeta-Sigma

Project Zeta-Sigma The Fifth Doctor
aka Project “4G”, Project Zeta Plus, Zeta Plus One, Incident On Zeta Minor
Writers: John Flanagan and Andrew McCulloch Notes: After completing Meglos, Flanagan and McCulloch began developing “Project ‘4G’”, which was commissioned as a storyline on August 15th, 1980. The writers envisioned the new adventure as a parable on nuclear disarmament, with the detente between the Hawks and the Doves serving as a parallel for the Cold War. Around this time, it was decided that “Project ‘4G’” would be the first story for the Fifth Doctor, and hence the concluding part of a trilogy of adventures featuring the Master. Flanagan and McCulloch were asked to incorporate the Master into their plot, and it was decided that he would replace Sergo, and orchestrate the situation between the Hawks and the Doves in order to take over the solar system. The scripts were commissioned on October 7th; shortly thereafter, the title was changed to “Project Zeta Plus”. By early 1981, the story had become “Project Zeta-Sigma”, but concerns were mounting over scenes such as one involving a room full of invisible people. On February 19th, the decision was made to drop “Project Zeta-Sigma” from the production schedule. Consideration may have been given to deferring it to be made second (after Four To Doomsday), but ultimately Castrovalva was developed as the new season premiere. It was thought that “Project Zeta-Sigma” might be reworked to serve as the Season Nineteen finale, but this slot was taken by Time-Flight.
Characters: The Fifth Doctor, Adric, Nyssa, Tegan
Episodes: 4
Planned For: First (later seventh) story of Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Complete script
Synopsis: Two hostile planets are verging on war after one planet -- that of the Doves -- establishes an impregnable defense shield. In retaliation, the planet of the Hawks threatens to fire a super-missile which will destroy their solar system's sun and annihilate both worlds. This maneuver is advocated by Sergo, the Hawks' chief scientist, who secretly wants to use the political instability to allow the Hawk scientists to become the new ruling power. The Doctor is too late to prevent the Hawks' missile from being launched, but convinces both planets to fire their entire nuclear arsenals after it, in the hope of destroying the missile. These melt in proximity to the sun, but the missile fails to detonate anyway. It turns out that this was the Doctor's plan all along, and by engineering the destruction of the Hawks' and Doves' nuclear stockpiles, he has incited a new concordance between the two peoples.
References: Doctor Who Magazine #258, DWM Special Edition #1, DWM Special Edition #9

The Psychonauts The Fourth Doctor
Writer: David Fisher Notes: Fisher discussed this idea with script editor Douglas Adams shortly before Adams left Doctor Who in late 1979. The name Nephilim was drawn from the Old Testament and from various Jewish writings, where it refers to a kind of demon. “The Psychonauts” was not taken forward by new producer John Nathan-Turner, who instead asked Fisher to develop The Leisure Hive.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor, Romana, K-9
Episodes: Unknown
Planned For: Season Eighteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: The Doctor battles the Nephilim, creatures who travel through time in sleeping units shaped like sarcophagi.
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

Psychrons The Fourth Doctor The Fifth Doctor
Writer: Terence Greer Notes: This storyline was commissioned on June 13th, 1980. It was finally rejected sometime after April 1981, but it is not known if the idea's development extended to the point that Greer modified it to include the Fifth Doctor.
Characters: The Fourth Doctor (original submission; possibly later the Fifth Doctor)
Episodes: 4
Planned For: Season Nineteen
Stage Reached: Storyline
Synopsis: Unknown
References: Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #9

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